Keep your nose out of my business

"Keep your nose out of my business" means to not interfere in someone's affairs.

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Keep your nose out of my business” is a what you would say to somebody who was a busybody and a snoop.

When somebody involves themselves in your affairs and it does not concern them, telling them “keep your nose out of my business” is an appropriate thing to tell them.

Americans are very private in many areas.   It would be considered rather intrusive to ask someone in a dating relationship when they will marry.

Don’t worry, when they get married, they will tell you.   That type of question is rather personal.  They might not say it to be polite, but they may be thinking “keep your nose out of my business”

So is how much one earns.   Someone might say “keep your nose out of my business” if you ask them how much money they make.

We say “keep your nose out of my business” if someone is meddling or interfering in one’s personal matters.

Example:   “Keep your nose out of my business.   Don’t ask me about that conversation.  It didn’t involve you.”

“Don’t ask me my political views.  Keep your nose out of my business.

It is my business to ask you to attempt a sentence using “keep your nose out of my business“.    But I hope I am not intruding when I ask you to tell us how to say “keep your nose out of my business” in Chinese!

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Comments

  1. tastwell says:

    Don’t ask about my exam result. Keep your nose out of my business.
    We usually say “别管闲事“ or ”少管闲事”
    By the way, among Chinese one of the questions often asked is just “how much money do you make a month?” It’s totally defferent from Western people. I remember clearly our English told us not to ask a foreign friend how much he can earn if we had, when I began to learn English. It’s not polite to ask about one’s age in your culture, right? And this is also an subject our Chinese often ask.

    • landawei says:

      @tastwell.

      Asking how much one makes in our culture is a big “no-no”. We simply do not do that. It is consider a very intrusive question.
      Asking age is also a big “no-no” but moreso with women than men.

      Does that help?

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